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News Release

Phoenix Children’s Creates New Center for Cleft and Craniofacial Care, Welcomes Nine New Providers

PHOENIX [Dec. 19, 2022] – Phoenix Children's, one of the nation’s fastest-growing pediatric health systems, today announced the creation of the Phoenix Children’s Center for Cleft and Craniofacial Care. Nine medical providers specializing in cleft and craniofacial care, formerly of Barrow Neurological Institute’s Cleft and Craniofacial Center, have joined Phoenix Children’s Medical Group (PCMG) as part of this transition.

“Phoenix Children’s clinicians have worked side-by-side with this cleft and craniofacial team for many years,” said Daniel Ostlie, MD, surgeon in chief at Phoenix Children’s. “Not only will their addition to the Phoenix Children’s Medical Group deepen our expertise, but they’ll enable us to serve more children in need of complex care.”

The providers joining PCMG’s team are among the best in their field and include plastic surgeons, craniofacial orthodontists, clinical geneticists, speech and language pathologists and numerous other pediatric specialists. Children who need care for cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis, plagiocephaly and other craniofacial conditions will benefit from having seamless, coordinated care through Phoenix Children’s Medical Group. Recruiting additional specialists is also a top priority for the center.

The new center will be led by Davinder J. Singh, MD, division chief of plastic surgery at Phoenix Children’s. Dr. Singh is supported by co-directors Patricia Beals, DMD, craniofacial orthodontist; and Kelly Cordero, PhD, CCC-SLP, a speech-language pathologist. The center’s current location at 124 W. Thomas Road, Suite 320, in Phoenix will remain the same, as will the providers serving patients with cleft or craniofacial disorders.

“Children who have craniofacial conditions often need other specialty care, as well,” said Dr. Singh. “In expanding our team of specialized experts in PCMG, we are making it simpler and more seamless for families to access care across Phoenix Children’s more than 75 subspecialties while also benefiting from improved care coordination and better outcomes.”

The creation of Phoenix Children’s Center for Cleft and Craniofacial Care comes during a time of significant growth for Phoenix Children’s. The health system is expanding its physical footprint across greater Phoenix, recruiting top clinical and executive-level talent, expanding primary and specialty care and creating a comprehensive, fully integrated team of clinicians throughout PCMG.

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