Skip to main content

COVID-19 Advisory: Only one primary caregiver may accompany a patient at all locations. Masks required for visitors and patients ages 2+. For more information, visit our COVID-19 Resource Center.

Conditions We Treat

Hematology Department

The hematology specialists at Phoenix Children’s Hospital care for children with a wide range of blood disorders — many more than are listed here. We understand that researching your child’s blood disorder and treatment options can be overwhelming. Please feel free to contact us with any questions. We are ready to help.

Hemostasis (Bleeding) and Thrombosis (Clotting) Disorders

  • Antithrombin deficiency - This inherited condition increases the risk for life-threatening blood clots.
  • Factor V leiden - This inherited disorder can increase the risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), although many people with Factor V Leiden do not experience thrombosis.
  • Hemophilia A - The most common form of hemophilia, caused by a deficiency of a clotting protein called factor VIII, is sometimes called classic hemophilia. In hemophilia, the blood does not clot properly, which can lead to severe blood loss from even minor injuries.
  • Hemophilia B - This form of hemophilia, sometimes called Christmas disease, is caused by a deficiency of clotting factor IX. 
  • Hemophilia C - This more mild form of hemophilia is caused by a deficiency of clotting factor XI.
  • Prothrombin gene mutation - This inherited disorder can increase the risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), although many people with prothrombin gene mutation do not experience thrombosis.
  • Protein C deficiency - This condition ranges from mild to severe and can lead to dangerous blood clots.
  • Protein S deficiency - This condition also ranges from mild to severe and can lead to dangerous blood clots.
  • von Willebrand disease - Children with this disorder may have low levels of a clotting blood protein called von Willebrand factor, or the factor may not be working well. This disease may also cause problems with clotting factor VIII.

Other Hematology Diagnoses

  • Sickle cell disease - In children with sickle cell disease, an abnormal type of hemoglobin (a protein in red blood cells) causes red blood cells to be hard, sticky and crescent-shaped. These cells cannot move freely through blood vessels and can block blood flow. Sickle cell disease can lead to pain, damage to organs, and can also lead to anemia (a shortage of red blood cells). There are many forms of sickle cell disease. Your child’s care team will talk to you about the type of sickle cell your child has and how best to treat and manage it.
  • Anemia - Anemia is when someone does not have enough red blood cells. There are many causes of anemia including iron deficiency, thalassemia, bone marrow failure and hemolysis, to name a few. Some are lifelong and some are not. Our team provides care of all types of anemia and can discuss your child’s specific diagnosis and treatment.
  • Thrombocytopenia - Thrombocytopenia is when someone doesn’t have enough platelets. Platelets are cells made by your bone marrow, and this deficiency can lead to bleeding and bruising. There are many causes of thrombocytopenia including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), bone marrow failure and autoimmune illnesses, to name a few. Some are lifelong and some are not. Our team provides care of all types of thrombocytopenia and can discuss your child’s specific diagnosis and treatment.
  • Neutropenia - Neutropenia is when someone doesn’t have enough neutrophils. Neutrophils are cells made by your bone marrow, and this deficiency can lead to infections. There are many causes of neutropenia including infection, bone marrow failure and autoimmune illnesses, to name a few. Some are lifelong and some are not. Our team provides care of all types of neutropenia and can discuss your child’s specific diagnosis and treatment.
  • Thalessemia - Thalassemia is a condition in which bone marrow produces smaller and fewer red blood cells, resulting in anemia. Thalassemia trait does not cause any medical problems, but thalassemia major causes severe anemia which requires treatment.

Bone Marrow Failure Program

  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia - Children with this rare blood disorder don’t make enough red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout the body.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita - This rare congenital condition affects the skin and nails and can lead to bone marrow failure.
  • Fanconi anemia - In this rare genetic condition, the bone marrow doesn’t make enough blood cells. 
  • Schwachman-Diamond anemia - This rare inherited type of bone marrow failure leads to a low number of white blood cells, poor growth and, sometimes, skeletal abnormalities.
  • Severe Congenital neutropenia - In this condition, a lack of neutrophils (a type of white blood cells) can lead to bacterial infections and an increased risk of leukemia.
Share this page